Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication with mesh-hiatoplasty: Single center experience and early-term results

Mehmet Tolga Kafadar, Metin Yalaza, Ahmet Türkan, Önder Sürgit, Gürkan Değirmencioğlu, Işilay Nadir

Abstract


Purpose: In this study we report early-term results of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication with mesh hiatoplasty that we perform to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 68 patients who underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication with mesh hiatoplasty at our clinic. Thirty-six (53%) patients were male and 32 (47%) were female. The mean age of the study population was 46.1 (25-72) years. All patients underwent endoscopy, esophagus pH metry and manometry before the operation. All operations were performed under general anesthesia using five ports. In addition to Nissen fundoplication, all patients also underwent polypropylene mesh placement.

Results: Preoperatively, all patients reported a burning sensation in the chest and regurgitation of the stomach contents up into the mouth. The mean time from symptom onset to operation was 28 (6-84) months. All patients were diagnosed with  esophagitis in the preoperative endoscopic examination. The mean operative time was 80 (40-125) minutes, the median duration of hospital stay was 1.2 (1-4) days and the median follow-up time was 12 (2-30) months. Functional outcome was excellent in 65% of patients, good in 24.5%, moderately good in 7% and poor in 3.5%.

Conclusion: Fundoplication with mesh hiatoplasty is a surgical procedure performed for the traetment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia. Surgery can be safely carried out with low morbidity and mortality rates and constitutes an alternative to long-term drug therapy. We believe that this operation is beneficial since it reduces the rate of recurrences to a significant degree.

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